French Brie

A - B

Abondance de Savoie

Abondance de Savoie is pressed, brine-soaked & aged, during which time it is rubbed with salt. This cheese may replace or combine mountain cheeses such as Comte or Gruyere for melting purposes to add extra dimensions of flavor. The texture is firm with a tight paste & the flavor is full, buttery and nutty with a fruity tang and a grassy finish. This cheese is made only from the mixed race breed of cattle that carries the same name of that region.

Country: France
Region: Haute-Savoie, Abondance (Alps Mountains)
Texture: Semi-Hard
Type of Milk: Cow
Aging Time: 90 Days
Pasteurized: No

Alta Badia

Alta Badia is made from fresh whole cows milk from a small number selected dairy farms. It ripens for approximately 180 days, creating a light brown rind and a somewhat firm texture. It is a flavorful Italian mountain cheese with savory flavors and aromas. Alta Badia is named after the small town in the Alps and has the mountain flavor components that are nutty and earthy without being either overpowering or too rustic. It resembles many Swiss cheeses in texture and flavor such as Appenzeller and Gruyere.

Country: Italy
Region: Alta Badia, Dolomite Mountains, Veneto
Texture: Semi-Hard
Type of Milk: Cow
Aging Time: 180 Days
Pasteurized: No

Antico Mugello

Antico Mugello is an Italian, sheep’s milk cheese that is produced by the Il Forteto Cooperative in the Tuscan town of Mugello, Made from pasteurized milk, it is aged for about two months and develops into a cheese that is semi-hard in texture and straw colored in appearance.  Similar in the way that Rossellino is made, the rind is rubbed with tomato concentrate, adding an element of complexity to its flavor is both rustic and slightly sweet. The cheese is fairly dense and nutty with salty undertones.

Country: Italy
Region: Tuscany
Texture: Semi-Hard
Type of Milk: Sheep
Aging time: 2 months
Pasteurized: Yes

Appenzeller

Appenzeller is a Swiss mountain cheese that originates in the Appenzell region of Switzerland, near the Austrian border. It is bathed in a mixture of wine, spices and salt which produces an orange rind that is semi-hard and dry. This cheese has a fairly dense texture, with a rich, nutty and tangy flavor, which ranges from smooth and mild to full and rich, depending on how long it is aged. Appenzeller is one of the three cheeses, along with Gruyere and Emmental, that is traditionally used in authentic Swiss Fondue. There are three different types of Appenzeller:

  • "Classic" - Aged 3-4 months and wrapped in silver
  • "Surchoix" - Aged 4-6 months and wrapped in gold
  • "Extra" - Aged 6+ months and wrapped in black

Country: Switzerland
Region: Appenzell
Texture: Semi-Hard
Type of Milk: Cow
Aging Time: At least 3 months
Pasteurized: No

Asiago

Asiago Pressato

Asiago is an Italian cheese that according to different aging can assume different textures from smooth for the fresh Asiago (Asiago Pressato) to a crumbly texture for the aged cheese (Asiago d'allevo) similar to an aged Gouda and Parmesan. Asiago is by law required to come from the Co-ops, specialized groups of local dairies, only from the areas of Vicenza and Trento and selected areas of Padua and Treviso. These co-ops are highly regulated to ensure first-rate grass fed cow's milk. This cheese features a complex variety of flavors ranging from fruity to nutty to pungent.

Country: Italy
Region: Veneto
Texture: Ranges from Semi-Soft to Hard
Type of Milk: Cow
Age Time: At least 1 month
Pasteurized: By law in the US only for Asiago Pressato, not in most of Europe


Asiago Pressato is a fresh cheese, semi-soft in texture and very mild in flavor. It works well as a mild table or melting cheese or when used in sandwiches. The consistency and texture resemble yogurt cheeses but the flavor is more complex, tangy, and buttery but not overwhelmingly rich.

 

Asiago d'allevo is the mature and firmer cheese that is labeled with three different names, depending on how long it ages. The Asiago d'allevo varieties are often grated as a table cheese for salads, soups, and pastas.

Asiago d'Allevo

  • "Asiago Mezzano" - Aged at least 3 months
  • "Asiago Vecchio" - Aged at least 1 year
  • "Asiago Stravecchio" - aged over 1 year

Basilio (Pecorino al Basilico)

Basilio is an Italian pasteurized sheep's milk cheese. This cheese is produced by the Il Forteto Cooperative in the Tuscan town of Mugello. It is a classic Pecorino with basil and extra virgin olive oil rubbed on its rind. Its flavor is rustic and sharp with salty undertones. Its pate is ivory in color and rich in texture.

Country: Italy
Region: Tuscany
Texture: Semi-Hard
Type of Milk: Sheep
Aging time: At least 60 days
Pasteurized: Yes

Beaufort

Beaufort is protected name of origin (AOC) cheese from the Savoie region in France. It is a semi-firm, full-flavored mountain cheese that is often compared to Gruyere and Comte. It has a yellowish brown rind, creamy yet firm texture with a nutty flavor and a grassy aroma. This cheese is is a great substitution of Swiss cheeses for fondue. There are three types of Beaufort:

  • Beaufort
  • Beaufort d'ete (Summer Beaufort - milk from June through October)
  • Beaufort d'alpage (made on alpine chalets with the milk of a local herd)

Country: France
Region: Savoie, South Eastern France
Texture: Semi-Firm
Type of Milk: Cow
Aging Time: Minimum 6 Months
Pasteurized: No

Bleu d'Auvergne

Bleu D'Auvergne is a protected name of origin, (AOC) cheese from the Auvergne region in France. It is a cows milk blue cheese. It was first produced in the 1850s by a farmer in the Massif Centrale, an area of France consisting of mountains and rich volcanic soil. It is first aged in cellars for one or two months before it is wrapped in foil and aged for an additional month. Bleu D'Auvergne has a strong aroma and sharp taste but is less pungent than many other blue cheeses. It is less salty and creamier than Roquefort and uses cows milk instead of ewe's milk. It has an off-white colored interior with an uneven spread of blue veins. Its well balanced sharp flavor makes it a very versatile ingredient for many dishes. 

Country: France
Region: Auvergne (South Central France)
Texture: Semi-Soft Blue
Type of Milk: Cow
Aging Time: Minimum 2 Months
Pasteurized: No

Boschetto al Tartufo Bianchetto

Boschetto al Tartufo Bianchetto is a sweet and mild cheese made from the blend of cow's and sheep's milk. This cheese is produced by the Il Forteto Cooperative in the Tuscan town of Mugello. Mixed throughout are shavings of rare white truffles which builds character in the cheese by providing rustic and earthy undertones in the flavor. The mild aroma and creamy texture of the cheese along with the mushroomy taste of the truffles create a harmonious blend of fresh and rustic flavors.

Country: Italy
Region: Tuscany, Italy
Texture: Semi-Soft
Type of Milk: Blend of Cow and Sheep
Aging Time: Less than 60 days
Pasteurized: Yes 

Boule de Lille (Mimolette)

Mimolette is a pasteurized cows milk cheese, produced in the Nord Pas-de-Calais region in northern France that closely resembles the shape, size, and look of a melon. In fact, this cheese is produced by the same process of Dutch Edam.  There are many arguments as to where this cheese was originally produced. Some argue that Mimolette originated in Holland whereas others insist it was founded in France. During the reign of Louis XIV, it was illegal in France to import cheeses from Holland. One theory is that the French from Normandy developed this cheese as a result to their cultural ties to Holland. The cheese is bright orange in color with a natural, dusty looking rind. Its texture varies from firm to hard the flavor most closely resembles the sharp and tangy flavors of a well-aged cheddar. The cheese also carries the name “Boule de Lille” since the cheese originates from the town of Lille. This cheese is classified into four different categories based on its aging time:

  • Mimolette Jeune (aged 2 months)
  • Mimolette demi-vielle (aged 6 months)
  • Mimolette vielle (aged 12 months)
  • Mimolette tres vielle (aged 18-24 months)

Country: France
Region: Nord Pas-de-Calais
Texture: Firm to Hard
Type of Milk: Cow
Aging time: 2-24 months
Pasteurized: Yes

Bra

Bra is an Italian DOP cheese from the province of Cuneo in Piedmont. It is a semi-hard cows milk cheese. However, there are times where a little bit of goat's or sheep's milk is added. It is cylindrical in shape and ranges from semi-firm to firm texture with a pale yellow colored pate and a slightly sharp body. The younger versions of this cheese are creamier in texture and less piquant in flavor. There are two types of Bra cheese based on their aging time:

  • Bra Tenero - Aged at least 45 days
  • Bra Duro - Aged at least 6 month

Country: Italy
Region: Cuneo, Piedmont
Texture: Semi-firm to firm
Type of milk: Primarily Cow
Aging time: At least 45 days
Pasteurized: Typically unpasteurized

Brebicet

Brebicet is a smooth, soft, bloomy-rind sheep's milk cheese from the Rhone-Alps region in France with a white, velvety and pillowy bloomy rind. Produced by the Guilloteau creamery, Brebicet has a delicate and supple paste that is creamy and soft. Its slightly sweet and mild flavors makes this cheese perfect for all occasions.

Country: France
Region: Rhone-Alps
Texture: Bloomy Rind
Type of Milk: Sheep
Aging Time: 1 to 2 weeks
Pasteurized: Yes

Brezain

Brezain is a smoked, cow's milk, raclette-style French cheese produced in the mountainous Alps. After the cheese is produced, it is exposed to smoke generated from a wood fire highly humid atmosphere. This atmosphere allows the smoke flavor to penetrate into the cheese, giving it a rustic element to its already caramelly and nutty taste. The end result is a semi-soft cheese with an off-white, ivory colored pate and rich brown rind.

Country: France
Region: Rhone-Alps
Texture: Semi-Hard
Type of Milk: Cow
Aging Time: Less than 60 days
Pasteurized: By law in the US but not in most of Europe

Brie

Brie de Meaux

Brie is the most popular French cheese in the world. Brie is a double-creme cheese that screams out elegance and class. It is named after the French region in the north-central portion of the country and is made using cows milk. Within the region are the smaller villages which produce origin protected Brie cheeses. Traditional "Basic Bries" do not have the AOC certification and so the while the name is typically used to identify a cheese in the Ile-de-France area of the country, the term Brie is also used synonymously to describe cheeses of this bloomy rind variety. There are only two types of true authentic Bries that carry the name protected origin (AOC) certification: 1) Brie de Meaux, and 2) Brie de Melun.


Brie cheeses are argued to have differentiating flavors and colors if the cheese is made with pasteurized milk or unpasteurized milk. While all types of Brie cheeses have the same flavor components, typically associated with a creamy buttery flavor with mushroom undertones and velvety white bloomy rind, the unpasteurized version has been described as having a richer flavor and more yellow interior pate.

Country: France
Region: Ile-de-France, 40 miles east of Paris
Texture: Bloomy-Rind
Type of Milk: Cow
Aging Time: At least 1 week
Pasteurized: By law in the US but not in most of Europe

Brigante

Brigante is a sheep milk cheese from the Italian island of Sardinia. Manufactured by Fratelli Pinna, a cheese-making company located in the north of the Island, this pecorino cheese is semi-soft in texture with a pale, ivory color. Matured for about three weeks, it has a mild and creamy flavor with citrus undertones.  Its texture is smooth, moist, and fairly elastic. This is a delicious table cheese that is manufactured in wheels that are approximately three pounds.

Country: Italy

Region: Sardinia

Texture: Semi-Soft

Type of Milk: Sheep

Aging time: 2 weeks

Pasteurized: Yes

Le Brin

Le Brin is a farmhouse cheese traditionally produced in the Rhone-Alps region of France that is made from cow’s milk with a washed rind. It is a milder and sweeter version of typical French washed rind cheeses which are highly aromatic and fully flavored. It is made with a vegetarian rennet. The cheese is produced in a hexagonal shape by the Guilloteau creamery.  The end result is a creamy and spreadable paste with a reddish orange edible rind.

Country: France
Region: Rhone-Alps
Texture: Washed Rind
Type of Milk: Cow
Aging Time: Less than 60 days
Pasteurized: Yes

Bucheron

Bucheron is a bloomy-rind goat cheese that is produced in the Loire Valley in France. It has a bright white and fairly dense pate that crumbles yet is creamy while eaten. The ivory-colored ring just beneath the rind is softer and creamier with a fresh and tangy flavor. The cheese is produced in long 3 to 4 pound logs and also hails the name Buche de Chevre. This cheese is great with honey and crackers, crumbled into a salad, or eaten with fresh fruit.

Country: France
Region: Loire Valley
Texture: Bloomy-Rind
Type of Milk: Goat
Aging Time: 5-10 Weeks
Pasteurized: By law in the US but not in most of Europe

Burrata

This deliciously creamy cheese is a specialty of Southern Italy, especially in the regions of Apulia, Campania, and Basilicata. Burrata was invented in Andria at the beginning of the 20th century. Like Mozzarella, traditional Burrata is made with water buffalo milk although it is now more popularly made with cows milk. The method used to make Burrata is very similar to that used for Mozzarella.  The difference lies in the method used to form the "bag". A layer of stretched curd about one centimeter thick is molded and formed into the desired envelope shape. 

Country: Italy
Region: Southern Italy
Texture: Fresh
Type of Milk: Water Buffalo or Cow
Aging time: Not aged - Meant to be eaten within 7 days of production
Pasteurized: Yes

The bag is then filled with strings of stretchy curd that have been amalgamated with cream from the whey, obtained by separating leftover whey from mozzarella production in a centrifuge. The cheese is then wrapped in leaves of asfodelo, which is an herb-like plant similar to leeks. The color of the leaf is used as an indicator of the cheeses freshness. The center is rich and buttery as the name of the cheese comes from the Italian word "burro" meaning butter. Burrata is smooth on the outside, lustrous white in color, and has a mild buttery taste.